Department of Business Administration
Department of Business Administration
Dean:Dr. Friðrik Már Baldursson
Email:vd@ru.is
Website:http://www.ru.is/vd
TeachersView
MSc in Corporate Finance
MSc in Corporate Finance
Semesters:4
Years:2
ETCS:120
Learning OutcomesView
Education cycle2
Degree titleMaster in Corporate Finance
Haustönn/Fall 2019
Creative Approaches and Entrepreneurial Mindsets ElectiveV-702-CREMECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Hannes Ottósson
Content
 The purpose of this course is to introduce and involve students to adopt entrepreneurial mindsets and creative approaches. To act and think in creative ways is a core capacity in post-industrial societies on the verge of a new revolution, characterised by continuous change and ruptures. It is a well-documented claim that no longer can we rely on previously learned expertise to ensure our future careers and to solve current challenges. In this environment leadership and entrepreneurship needs to involve the ability to act as a force of change. This course addresses entrepreneurship, innovation, and leadership, by putting creativity and entrepreneurial mindsets at the core. The course starts from the premise that entrepreneurship, innovation and leadership are creative and contextual processes driven by passion, commitment and the ability to navigate in unfamiliar territories. These processes have a tendency to be non-linear, involving both organizing and disorganizing. The course will challenge students on recognizing their interests and passions. It will also challenge their problem solving skills and ability to lead such tasks. Classes will be a combination of lectures and workshops relying on students’ active participation. At times, classes will involve guest teachers. Students will be required to work on assignments between classes; workshops and assignments will frequently be organized around challenges practicing entrepreneurial problem solving, as well as attempting to utilize students’ interests and strengths.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. Students should: - Understand and be able to account for essential concepts, tools and techniques addressing creative challenges, entrepreneurial mindsets and approaches. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different creative and entrepreneurial tasks. Students should: - Be able to critically asses the importance of addressing situations, events and challenges in an alternative or creative manner. - Be able to critically asses the relevance and impact of entrepreneurial mindsets, including personal interests, knowledge, and passions, for entrepreneurial processes and innovative outcomes. - Be able to identify difference between entrepreneurial solution creation and strategic or managerial problem solving. Competencies: The ability to apply knowledge and skills to entrepreneurial challenges. Students should: - Be able to apply alternative and creative approaches to challenges. - Be able to lead and organize entrepreneurial processes. - Be able to select and develop entrepreneurial challenges where they can apply their passions, knowledge and skills.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A field of knowledge and practice ElectiveV-703-INENECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Pernille Smith
Content
The course has two main modules. One module emphasizes innovation and the other entrepreneurship. Both modules are developed on the backdrop of essential research in these fields knowledge. The module on innovation focuses on the fundamentals of managing innovation at individual, team and firm level. Students will acquire knowledge about central concepts of innovation and develop skills and competences to be able to manage skilfully innovation in terms of organisational structures, competences, and processes. It focuses on the organisational activities of innovation, including how to organise them effectively and how to overcome the challenges of collaboration, knowledge sharing, and complex problem solving. The module on entrepreneurship focuses on central concepts and processes of entrepreneurship. Students will gain knowledge-based insights into the ‘why’, ‘when’, ‘who’ and ‘how’ of entrepreneurship and adopt entrepreneurial skills and competencies. This includes viewing entrepreneurship in the context of economy, society and the individual.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Understand essential concepts, tools and techniques for managing innovation processes. - Understand essential concepts and processes of entrepreneurship at the level of economy, society and the individual. - Be able to account for contextual sensitivity at different levels of innovation management. - Be able to account for the drivers and catalysers of entrepreneurship. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks of innovation and entrepreneurship. The student should: - Be able to critically asses the importance of innovation at the level of the organisation. - Be able to critically asses the relevance and impact of entrepreneurship at an economic, social and individual level. - Be able to identify contextual aspects of innovation management and at the same time how it differs from other organisational tasks and objectives. - Be able to identify difference between entrepreneurship and other managerial and economic processes. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in innovation and entrepreneurship. The student should: - Be able to systematically evaluate organizational challenges for innovation. - Be able to organize and lead an innovation process, including leading innovation (or R&D) teams. - Be able to systematically evaluate entrepreneurial challenges and opportunities. - Be able to organize and navigate in an entrepreneurial process.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Fundamentals in Tourism and Hospitality Management ElectiveV-704-FTHMECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Sara Ghezzi
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with an overview of the tourism and hospitality industry and with hospitality management principles and theories to identify and analyze relevant industry problems and issues facing management and personnel. Students will have the opportunity to explore the major emerging issues or problems that impact the global tourism and hospitality industry.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Have an understanding of the tourism and hospitality industry, stakeholders in tourism and hospitality management, value creation in the tourism industry. - Know main tourism and hospitality management principles and theories. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks in the context of tourism and hospitality management. The student should: - Be able to identify and analyze relevant tourism and hospitality industry problems and issues facing management and personnel. - Be able to identify and analyze major emerging issues or problems that impact the global tourism and hospitality industry. - Be able to analyze the ethical issues and conflicts of interest related to tourism and hospitality management. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in auditing. The student should: - Be able to take part in professional discussions on tourism and hospitality management. - Be able to individually and in teams manage business projects in the field of tourism and hospitality.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Financial Reporting and Accounting Standards I ElectiveV-705-FIR1ECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Unnar Friðrik Pálsson
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with an extensive knowledge of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and the Icelandic Financial Reporting Act and to develop students’ skills and competences to apply this knowledge. Extensive analysis will be made of the main principles of the IFRS as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board and the laws and regulations governing the preparation of financial accounts based on the provisions of the Icelandic Financial Reporting Act. The following topics and concepts are covered: Presentational demands of IFRS for the basic financial statements, substantive rules with respect to inventories, accounts receivables, property, plant and equipment, intangibles, owners’ equity accounts and current liabilities, construction cost contracts and basic lease accounting and pension liabilities. The principles of historical cost, revenue recognition, deferred income tax liabilities and assets and statement of cash flow will be explained as well as other main principles of financial accounting.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Be familiar with the main principles of the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). - Be familiar with the Icelandic Financial Reporting Act and corresponding laws and regulation. - Understand the responsibilities in financial reporting and auditing. - Understand potential conflicts of interest and ethical issues regarding financial reporting and auditing. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks of financial reporting and auditing. The student should: - Be able to identify the relevant IFRS and/or national rules for different financial reporting issues. - Be able to identify ethical issues regarding financial reporting and auditing. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in financial reporting and auditing. The student should: - Be able to take part in a professional discussion on financial reporting and auditing. - Apply relevant IFRS and/or national rules for different financial reporting issues. - Be able to justify the use of specific IFRS or national rules for specific reporting issues.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionIcelandic
Auditing, Auditing Standards and Ethics in Accounting and Auditing ElectiveV-706-AUD1ECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Oddur Ás Garðarsson
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with an introduction to the audit according to International Standards on Auditing, to how the Audit is planned and different processes of the stages involved, and to the Code of Ethics. Content: This course covers the fundamentals of auditing. The role of the auditor in the economy will be discussed and how auditing should be performed according to standards on auditing issued by the International Federation of Accountants. The following topics and concepts are covered: Auditor independence, rules of ethics and auditor legal responsibilities. Additionally, the following topics will also be discussed: audit evidence, internal controls, and audit testing. More specifically test of controls and substantive test will be dealt with in detail with respect to the various accounting processes. Audit reports of various kinds will also be analyzed to explain the circumstances under which they are provided.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Have a basic understanding of auditing and the auditing process. - Have a basic understanding of auditing standards and their application. - Understand the role of auditors, conflicts of interest and ethical issues in auditing. - Be familiar with audit reports. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks in the context of auditing. The student should: - Have a basic understanding on how to plan the auditing process - Be able to identify the relevant auditing standards - Be able to provide appropriate audit documentation regarding basic audit procedures. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in auditing. The student should: - Be able to take part in a professional discussion on audits, the audit process and auditors’ work and ethics. - Be able to understand basic audit procedures
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionIcelandic
Strategic Management ElectiveV-712-STJOECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Marcus Asplund
Marie Louise Mors
Content
The purpose of this course is to push students to think strategically in different situations. Therefore the course provides students with essential knowledge in strategic management and develops skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: General Management involves the coordination and integration of the efforts within the different functional areas of an organization for dealing with an uncertain future. This comprises formulating a strategy for each individual business of the firm, formulating a corporate and business strategy and implementing these strategies. In this course we will focus on the formulation of a competitive strategy for a business of a firm. Competitive strategy formulation involves understanding the business you are in, determining how to positioning your strategic unit within this business environment, and, developing the capabilities to compete in this environment. The course introduces the students to a coherent framework that can be used to analyze the competitive environment of a firm and its internal strengths and weaknesses. Students are expected to be able to deal with the strategy concepts introduced. Nevertheless, there remain tools, which should aid students in becoming better strategic thinkers. The ultimate objective is to formulate a strategy for a business that will shape the future environment of the firm and will aid a firm with its strategic decision-making in this future.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Understand the role of strategy in general management of organizations - Know main strategy concepts for organizations - Understand the consequences of an uncertain future for an organization - Understand the role of an organization in its competitive environment - Know the concepts of strengths and weaknesses of organizations - Are familiar with techniques to identify and analyze strengths and weaknesses of organizations - Are familiar with techniques and frameworks to analyze the competitive environment of organizations. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different settings in strategic management. The student should be able to: - Identify and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of organizations - Analyze the competitive environment of organizations - Analyze the strategy in place and identify room for improvement Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in strategic management. The student should be able to: - Apply strategy concepts to an organizational context - Formulate individually and in teams a competitive strategy for an organization - Actively shape the strategy of an organization - Develop and implement strategic decisions in an organization - Think strategically and deal with an uncertain future.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Organizational Psychology ElectiveV-715-ORPSECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Freyr Halldórsson
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with a solid knowledge of theories and concepts of organizational psychology and to develop students’ skills and competences to apply this knowledge in managerial decision making, in particular in the context of human resource management. Organizational psychology and Human resource management (HRM) are separate, but connected disciplines. Organizational psychology is an applied science that seeks to develop knowledge about relevant human behavior and to apply that knowledge to solve problems in organizations. The goal of HRM is to help organizations meet strategic goals by effectively attracting, retaining and managing employees while ensuring compliance with all appropriate labor laws. While the two disciplines cover many of the same topics relating to employees and organizations, they can have a somewhat different focus. The main focus of the course is on organizational psychology with the goal to introduce students to both the main topics relating to organizational psychology and how organizational psychology can be used within organizations. The course also considers how organizational psychology and HRM can together be applied within organizations to further organizational goals. The following topics and concepts are covered: - Employee selection - Fairness and diversity - Individual differences and assessment - Job analysis - Job design - Job evaluation - Job performance and measurement - Leadership - Stress and worker well-being - The motivation to work - Training and development - Work attitudes and emotions - Workgroups and teams
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Have a general understanding of organizational psychology, the basic concepts and theories, and of the discipline’s purpose, key topics, and methodologies. - Know how to apply theories and concepts to practical issues in the workplace. - Have increased understanding of the factors affecting employee behavior and how organizational psychology can be applied to impact organizational effectiveness. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks of human resource management. The student should: - Be able to analyze practical issues associated with human factors in the workplace. - Be able to apply theoretical knowledge to practical settings within organizations. - Be able to explain of how methods, theories and concepts of organizational psychology can be applied to analyze practical issues relating to people within organization to help solve organizational challenges. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in human resource management. The student should: - Show ability in group cooperation, contribute to analysis and assignments, have the ability to work independently as well as in active cooperation with others. - Be able to use relevant literature, theories and research findings to critically assess and support arguments and recommendations pertaining to practical issues in organizations.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Advanced Business Informatics ElectiveV-725-ABINECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Andrea Carugati
Content
 The purpose of the course is to provide students with the ability to utilize information and information technology as an asset for the management of their organization. The following topics and concepts are covered: Challenges related to organizational transformations that derive from, or include, an IT component. Strategic initiatives that rely on the implementation of new enterprise systems or their renewal, including their adaptation to the age of big data. The first part of the course will focus on the specific characteristics of IT implementation, the challenges that organizations can expect, and the strategic opportunities opened up by such processes. The second part of the course will focus on information as an asset and the more complex effects of technology. Participants will familiarize with the methodologies, processes, architectures and technologies to transform data into information and information into knowledge. As a mirror to this activity the course explores the dark, unintended, consequences of IT use and how they can influence organizational decision-making. Finally, the course covers the dynamics of IT role in organizations: IT related change and IT project management.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should:
- Understand the role of IT as enabler of or brake to business strategy
- Understand the role of governance on IT decisions
- Understand the impact of process design and data design on the functioning of an organization
- Understand the "dark side" of IT: control, surveillance, power
- Understand the dynamics of IT related change
The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks in the context of IT in organizations. The student should:
- Identify the information needs of organizational decision makers
- Identify potential optimization of the IT to support business strategy
- Identify the impact of changes in IT for different stakeholders in a company.
The ability to apply knowledge and skills in in the context of IT in organization. The student should:
- Plan the role of IT in organizations
- Address the informational needs of an organization through the selection and deployment of information systems.
- Judge the influence of different types of enterprise information systems on processes and data.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Staffing: from recruitment to termination ElectiveV-730-STRTECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
The purpose of this course is to build the participant´s ability to use good practices in staffing and workforce planning to build up a great team of employees. The course will emphasise reliable and valid methods and tools in all stages of personnel selection, whether internal or external or selecting employees out. Key labour law considerations and international comparisons in staffing practices and legal environments will be covered as well as ethical issues and dilemmas that may arise in staffing. The following topics and concepts are covered: The whole process of staffing and workforce planning will be covered, including external and internal recruitment, employer branding, job analysis, job design, job specifications, evaluation of candidates, decision making, contracting, retention, turnover, layoffs and alternative downsizing methods. Among key issues covered are causes and consequences of downsizing, survivor syndrome, staffing metrics and evaluation of selection success.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: -Understand and explain key theories, methods, frameworks and research findings relating to workforce planning, recruitment, selection and downsizing and the skills to apply them in different organizational contexts. -Understand key legal terms relating to staffing and how international labour law developments may affect hiring practices in different countries. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different settings of staffing processes. The student should: -Describe and apply key staffing models, concepts and strategies to various organizational settings. -Understand, critically analyse and respond objectively to key ethical issues and dilemmas that may arise in staffing. -Collect and analyse information from internal and external sources to undertake workforce planning and forecast labour force requirements and needs. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in staffing. The student should: -Develop and design staffing strategies in alignment with organizational HR strategy and business strategy, to ensure alignment between organizations and employees and between employees and jobs. -Critically evaluate the suitability of different methods and approaches to staffing in different internal and external contexts. -Develop, design and implement valid and reliable recruitment, selection and termination processes that abide with relevant labor legislation.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Labour law ElectiveV-731-LALAECTS 3,75
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Dagný Ósk Aradóttir Pind
Sonja Hjördís Berndsen
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with an understanding of labour law as well as general principles of the labour rights component to international, European and Icelandic labour law and with the skills and competences to integrate this understanding in decision making. Content: The legal environment is one of the main environmental factors that affect the management of people. Labour law governs the rights and duties of employers and employees which entails that all HRM decision making must comply with applicable labour law rules. The following topics and concepts are covered: The course provides an overview of the labour market and general principles of the labour rights component to international, European and Icelandic labour law. The labour rights field right is divided in to two main themes, the labour rights and the employment rights. The labour rights regard the social partners, collective agreements, the right to organize and the right to strike. The employment rights regard the rights and responsibilities of the employers and the employees, e.g. the making of and termination of a contract of employment and work obligations. Students will also learn the content and implementation of labour rights in national labour legislations set by the International Labour Organization (ILO) and European labour law.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge. The student should: - Recognize how legislation affects human resource management (HRM). - Describe the fundamental rules that regard the international, European and Icelandic labour market. - Implement the process of making HRM decisions in accordance with law. - Understand the rules that apply on the private and public sector of the labour market. - Understand the order in which different rules or other legal sources are applied to different situations. Skills. The student should: - Be able to identify which rules apply to different circumstances. - Be able to describe the rights and obligations of employees in both the public and private sector. - Be able to identify legal problems, analyse and assess them in regard of the rules of labour law and the collective agreements. Competences. The student should: - Be able to develop necessary learning skills and independence for further studies. - Be capable of presenting and describing the basic rights and duties for employers and employees. - Be able to apply the legal framework to practical situations in the workplace.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Change management and leadership ElectiveV-736-CMLEECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Karl Moore
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with a solid knowledge of theories and models with the aim of preparing them for future study in the field as well as taking a leadership role in the constantly changing organizational environment. The aim is to build up participants’ ability to analyze and implement change, using change techniques as well as an understanding of the response of individuals to change. Dealing with change is a constant challenge in organizations and the ability to effectively implement change is a key leadership skill. Individuals who aspire to leading and managing in organizations have to understand change, how it affects organizations and the people that make up those organization. The course introduces students to key issues, theories and concepts of change management.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Know and understand key issues, theories and concepts in leadership - Know and understand key issues, theories and concepts in change management - Recognize the complexity and ethics of leadership and change in organizations Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different change management and leadership tasks. The student should: - Demonstrate how methods, theories and concept in leadership and change management can be used to analyze issues, situations and challenges pertaining to leadership and change in organizations. - Understand how theories and concepts of change management and leadership can be used to support implementations of change initiatives and efficiently cope with the challenges of change. - Be able to use reflection to support the development of own leadership skills and learning. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in change management and leadership. The student should: - Use relevant literature, theories and research to critically assess/support arguments and recommendations pertaining to issues and challenges of leadership and change management - Discuss and study theories, concepts and issues of leadership and change with the aim of furthering own and others’ learning and understanding.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
International Marketing ElectiveV-736-INMAECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of course4. Second cycle, introductory
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Ramón Diaz-Bernardo
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with an integrated perspective of the interaction between the variables of the marketing mix, within the general strategy of a company, considering also the interrelation with demographic, political, economic and socio-cultural factors. Another purpose is to provide students with an understanding of the dynamics of the customer / marketing mix in an international context. A final purpose is to understand the different international expansion / marketing strategies available to a company, according to its specific needs and characteristics. The following topics and concepts are covered: This course will cover two main topics: Marketing Strategy for Decision Making and International Marketing Strategy. The Marketing Strategy for Decision Making part would be devoted to gain a better understanding of the main concepts of marketing management and marketing strategy. Students will see how a decision made today will affect the company’s value in the years to come. Not just in theory, but through the lessons of real market factors. Through direct competition, participants pilot a company through a competitive landscape in which all of their marketing skills are required. Whether creating a new market or further penetrating an existing one, both strategic and tactical abilities are required: R&D, finance, portfolio management, segmentation and positioning, as well as pricing, promotion and distribution. It also reinforces a strong focus on competitive thinking and market understanding and reflects the impact a sudden competitive move or changing customer needs can have on a company, and encourages teams to look beyond their own corporate walls for insight and ideas. International Marketing Strategy would be dedicated to analyse frameworks for developing international marketing strategies. Students look into different cases of marketing strategy for companies that are competing in the international market place, examine approaches to international market segmentation and positioning, and international marketing mix strategies. Different market entry strategies and methods of market analysis and market research will be examined.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Understand the variables of the marketing mix within the general strategy of a company, considering also the interrelation with demographic, political, economic and socio-cultural factors - Understand the dynamics of the customer / marketing mix in an international context - Understand the different international expansion / marketing strategies available to a company, according to its specific needs and characteristics - Understand frameworks for developing international marketing strategies. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different setting in international marketing. The student should be able to: - Identify how marketing decisions affect the company value - Identify potential impact of sudden competitive move or changing customer needs on a company - Analyse frameworks for developing international marketing strategies - Analyse the marketing strategy for companies that are competing in the international market place - Examine approaches to international market segmentation and positioning, and international marketing mix strategies - Analyse market entry strategies - Use methods of market analysis and market research. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in international marketing. The student should be able to: - Develop and implement an international marketing strategy in a competitive environment. - Think strategically in an international marketing context. - React to a sudden competitive move or changing customer needs can have on a company. - Choose and apply market analysis and market research methods to analyze specific research questions in the context of international marketing.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Advanced and digital marketing ElectiveV-738-ADDMECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Valdimar Sigurðsson
Vishnu M. Ramachandran Girija
Content
The aim of the course is to provide an advanced understanding of marketing with an emphasis on the strategy, implementation and practice of digital marketing. In the beginning, students will advance their understanding of key concepts and methods in marketing science and evidence-based practice. This includes marketing mix measures (e.g. new-product research, concept generation, product evaluation and development, test marketing, pricing, distribution and promotion), brand and customer metrics (e.g. competitive advantage, brand equity, customer satisfaction, marketing intelligence and customer profitability, and at last new age strategies (e.g. database marketing, E-commerce, mobile marketing, social media marketing, experiential marketing, relationship marketing, customer lifetime value and word of mouth marketing). The second part of the course will build on the advanced marketing topics as students will focus on digital marketing practice (e.g. online marketplace analysis, digital platforms, online customer experience, campaign planning, content marketing, conversion rate models, landing pages, website design and social media marketing). By the end of the course students should have an advanced understanding of several fundamental concepts in marketing and be able to plan, execute, and evaluate a digital marketing strategy.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Understand the importance of evidence based practice in digital marketing - Be able to account for selected concepts, theories, methods and practice in advanced marketing (see e.g. the aim of the course and the course outline) - Be able to place the latest knowledge in context within their field - Have knowledge of ethical problems in marketing (especially digital marketing) Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different settings in advanced and digital marketing. The student should: - Be able to discuss the strength and weakness related to the concepts, theories, methods and practice - Understand and tackle issues in digital marketing in a professional context - Collect, analyse and evaluate scientific papers and data - Be innovative in developing and applying ideas - Develop projects and place them in context by applying methods based on scientific theories and/or research. - Use theory to develop digital marketing strategy, built on research and evidence. - Be able to improve management decision-making and be able to provide relevant, accurate, and timely information to a marketing problem. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills to work and study. The student should: - Have developed the necessary learning skills and independence for further studies - Be able to initiate and implement digital marketing strategies - Be capable of presenting and describing marketing management issues and research findings in English - Be able to evaluate the suitability of the different methods and scientific issues in digital marketing
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Enterprise Architectures ElectiveV-746-ENARECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Stephan Aier
Content
 The purpose of the course is to understand the necessity for an enterprise-wide approach for planning, designing, and guiding enterprise architecture (EA) development, defining the components of an EA and their interrelations from a business-to-IT perspective, defining enterprise architecture modelling (EAM) processes, methods, and products, specifically EA modeling, EA planning, EA principles, and EA governance. Selecting software tool support for EAM, understanding the context, stakeholders, and application scenarios of EAM are also covered as well as institutionalizing EAM in organizations. Virtually all of today’s large organizations have to cope with the significant complexity of their information systems (IS) landscape. The application architecture of large organizations is often comprised of several hundred to some thousand applications that support business processes. These applications are implemented by an even larger number of software systems, which are run on various generations of information technology (IT) infrastructure. These components and their interrelations represent the architecture of an enterprise, i.e., EA. Changing only one of these EA components often impacts a potentially large number of related components of the organization. Changing several of these components at the same time in a number of projects or programs by division of labor leads to potentially redundant and/or inconsistent processes, applications, software systems, or IT infrastructure components. In other words, it creates misalignment in the EA. The factual short-term consequence of a misaligned EA is a waste of resources. The longer-term consequences are increasing efforts and difficulties to maintain existing IS and lacking resources for innovation. This development is almost inevitable unless explicitly addressed. This course discusses the concepts of EA and of EAM as a means to guide the design and evolution of EA. The course is taught in two blocks. The first block will focus on definitions, concepts, and methods of EA and EAM. The second block will focus on tool support, application, and institutionalization of EAM.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should:
- Understand the necessity for an Enterprise Architecture Modelling (EAM) approach in organizations.
- Understand the core components of Enterprise Architectures (EA)/Enterprise Architecture Modelling (EAM) and their interrelations.
- Are familiar with EAM processes, methods, and products, specifically EA modeling, EA planning, EA principles, and EA governance.
- Understand the context, stakeholders, and application scenarios of EAM.
- Know software tools that support EAM.
Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks in the context of enterprise architectures. The student should:
- Be able to apply basic EAM methods.
- Be able to plan and develop the EA.
- Be able to identify conflicts of interests between stakeholders and the need for EA governance.
- Be able to apply EAM software tools.

Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in the context of enterprise architectures. The student should:
- Be able to institutionalize EAM in organizations.
- Be able to evaluate the consistency, fit, and effectiveness of EAM initiatives in organizations.
- Be able to individually and in teams manage the EA in organizations.

Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Internship ElectiveV-748-INTEECTS 7,5
Year2. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Ásgeir Jónsson
Content
 The purpose of the internship is to further the preparation of students for their career and for being responsible players in organizations, such as companies, start-ups, governmental organizations (GOs) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Content: Internships provide students with opportunities through challenging hands-on projects that prepare them for entering or repositioning themselves in the labour market. Students will get to know the operations, culture and people in the organization that they are an intern in. Students will be assigned a supervisor within the organization and a full-time faculty member as a supervisor during the period of the internship. Students must have completed 30 ECTS credits in courses during their master´s studies at RU before starting an internship.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Understand how theories, concepts and techniques that are covered during their studies are used and applied in organizations. - Understand the decision making processes and the implementation of decisions in organizations. - Understand how single organizations are integrated in value chains/networks - Understand the interdisciplinary character of decision making in organizations - Understand the relationships between different stakeholders in/of organizations - Understand how organizations are integrated in social and environmental networks - Understand conflicts of interest and ethical issues in organizations. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to decision making and implementation processes in organizations. The student should: - Recognize the challenges in the practical use and application of course/study-based knowledge, skills and competences - Identify potential improvement and optimization in decision making and implementation processes in organizations - Identify solutions for real-world problems in organizations - Follow the implementation of solutions for real-world problems in organizations - Identify conflicts of interest and ethical issues in organizations - Recognize the social and environmental impact of organizations Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills to decision making and implementation processes in organizations. The student should: - Be able to develop, justify and implement solutions for real-world problems in organizations - Be able to reflect on their activities and decisions and corresponding consequences in organizations - Be able to integrate social and environmental responsibility in their decision making - Be able to work individually and in teams and to interact with different stakeholders in/of organizations - Be able to handle conflicts of interest and ethical issues in organizations - Be able to build a professional network
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish
Corporate Finance CoreV-765-CORPECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Claus Parum
Content
 The purpose of the course is to provide students with a solid knowledge of theories and models for corporations’ capital budgeting and financing decisions and to enhance their skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: Goal of the corporation, the capital budgeting decision, investment decisions under certainty, relationship between risk and return (portfolio risk, beta and CAPM), cost of capital, analyzing capital budgeting and risk, practical problems in capital budgeting, financing decisions, payout policy, capital structure, corporate governance and control, and an overview of the efficient market hypothesis. The course also addresses financial leasing, mergers, and corporate restructuring.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: On completion of the course students should:
- Be familiar with corporate finance vocabulary / theories / methods / models and underlying assumptions.
- Have a clear understanding of the goal of the corporation.
- Understand the relationship between risk and return.
- Have a clear understanding of how to estimate the cost of capital and how to value projects, firms, and stocks.
- Have a clear understanding of when financing (capital structure) and payout policy matters and when it does not.
- Be familiar with corporate control (who runs the business?) and corporate governance (making sure managers act in shareholders’ interests).
- Be familiar with the Efficient Market Hypothesis.
Skills: On completion of the course students should:
- Be able to evaluate a proposed investment project.
- Be able to assess the value impact of changes in capital structure and of payout policy.
- Be able to analyze financial leasing, mergers, and corporate restructuring.
- Be able to identify the effects of agency problems (conflicts of interests) and asymmetric information on the allocation of capital.

Competences: On completion of the course students should:
- Be able to independently combine and logically structure corporate finance vocabulary / theories / methods / models / regulatory/institutional/practical knowledge, and empirical evidence to solve corporate finance problems.
- Be able to solve corporate finance problems through accurate and correct calculations.
- Be able to show, explain and justify all relevant calculations to solve a given problem and to state and discuss the assumptions behind the theories / methods / models.
- Be able to manage a firm’s investments and justify investment decisions.
- Be able to make and justify financing decisions in the corporate context.
- Develop and implement a firm’s payout policy.
- Be able to work both independently and in a team on the financial issues of a firm.

Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
International Finance CoreV-767-INTFECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Thomas Walker
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with advanced knowledge of corporate finance and financial management in an international context and to enhance their skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The course focuses on financing and investment decisions in the international corporate context, including the financial risks associated with these decisions. The course provides an overview of international financial markets, international financial institutions, currencies and exchange rates as well as international capital flows. It focuses on risks related to international business activities, with emphasis on country risk and foreign exchange risk, and risk management in this regard. Beyond this, it discusses how to finance international operations and trade as well as international capital budgeting.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge:At the end of the course students possess in-depth knowledge of:
- international financial markets and institutions,
- country and foreign exchange risk including approaches to forecast exchange rates and exposure concepts,
- country and foreign exchange risk management including currency derivatives,
- international financing activities and capital structure decisions,
- international cost of capital calculations and capital budgeting, and
- foreign direct investments.
Skills:Students develop skills to:
- analyze a firm’s international activities with respect to international financial risks,
- identify, measure, and evaluate the impact of international financing activities on a firm´s capital structure and cost of capital,
- evaluate international investment opportunities, and
- recognize the limitations inherent in the theories discussed, including potential ethical conflicts, and the consequences of these limitations on the quality of decision making.
Competence:Students develop their competences to:
- identify financial challenges for international business activities,
- develop and justify appropriate solutions with respect to risk management, financing, and budgeting and implement these solutions in an international corporate context,
- evaluate strategies and measures in place and address necessary improvements, and
- reflect on the consequences of their decisions in the international corporate, economic, social, and ecological context.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Corporate Taxation ElectiveV-772-TAX1ECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Atli Þór Jóhannsson
Jón Ingi Ingibergsson
Content
 The purpose of the course is to provide students with a solid knowledge and understanding of the main principles of income tax, capital gains tax and value added tax and skills and competences to use this knowledge in the context of corporate taxation. The following topics and concepts are covered: Main provisions of law on Income Tax and VAT Law; main principles of limited and unlimited tax liability in Iceland; main rules in relation to deductible expenses; withholding tax on salary payments and on payments to foreign parties; rules regarding mergers and divisions and taxation of profit from sale of assets; filing of tax returns for companies with financial statements in foreign currency; main principles of VAT and different registrations (frjáls og sérstök skráning); VAT filing and payment; establishment of companies; taxation of different forms of companies; tax filings.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should:
- Understand the main provisions of the laws on income tax and value-added tax (VAT) in Iceland
- Know the main principles of limited and unlimited tax liability in Iceland
- Understand the main rules in relation to deductible expenses
- Know about withholding tax rules.
- Know the tax-relevant rules in the context of mergers and divisions and understand the taxation of profits from sale of assets
- Understand the filing of tax returns for companies with financial statements in foreign currency
- Understand the main principles of VAT and different registrations (frjáls og sérstök skráning) as well as how VAT shall be filed and paid
- Understand taxation issues when establishing companies, taxation of different forms of companies and tax filings.
Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks in the context of corporate taxation. The student should:
- Be able to identify and assess income tax and value-added tax issues
- Be able to assess the impact of different legal forms of companies on taxation
- Be able to prepare corporate tax filings and VAT filings
- Be able to identify relevant tax issues in the context of mergers and divisions
- Be able to identify relevant tax issues in the context of the establishment of companies.
Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in the context of corporate taxation. The student should:
- Be able to manage the tax issues of a company and prepare correct filings and tax calculations.

Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionIcelandic
Advanced Topics in Emerging Technologies ElectiveV-795-ATETECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Mohammad Adnan Hamdaqa
Content
 The purpose of the course is to provide students with an overview of Internet of Things and its enabling technologies (Cloud Computing, Social Networks and Virtual Reality, Mobile, and Big Data). The course sheds light on some of the technologies, frameworks, platforms and programming models that enable users to reap the benefits of these emerging technologies. According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), Cloud Computing, Social Networks, Mobile and Big Data are the four pillars, of the “Third Platform”; the core enabler for the Internet of Things (IoT). These technologies are interwoven in a variety of ways. Today, more than 70% of the top 50 Facebook apps are powered by cloud computing services. IoT and its associated technologies are transforming the way people and businesses relate to technology. They allow companies to make smarter products, enable smarter business operations and smarter decisions. At the heart of the third platform are cloud services. Cloud services and platforms provide the compute and storage capabilities that enable running big data frameworks, such as Hadoop and Spark. These platforms also provide the interfaces to enable remote access of data and smooth communication with mobile devices and sensor networks. Social technology and virtual reality completes the picture by adding the social aspects component to facilitate social interactions, and to weave the capabilities of mobile computing and devices with big data analytics to enables social communications and social analysis respectively. The following topics and concepts are covered: The course introduces students to concepts related to key emerging and disruptive technologies that every business needs to consider its implications. Examples of these technologies include: IoT, Cloud Computing, Big Data, Social Network and Virtual Reality, Mobile Computing.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - define and list the key pillars of the third platform, as defined by the International Data Corporation (IDC) - demonstrate understanding of the role of each of the Internet of Things (IoT) enabling technologies (i.e., Cloud Computing, Big Data, Social Network and Virtual Reality, Mobile Computing) and their applications - understand the risks and challenges as well as opportunities of applying such emerging technologies in business - know how to defend or support the decision of adopting or rolling out some of the explained emerging Technogym as part of an organization information technology strategy. Skills: The students should be able to: - architect solutions that involve a mashup of the explained emerging technologies - evaluate different solution offerings by various platform or solution providers - use the tools and case studies explained to reap the benefits of emerging technologies. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills acquired for business or research projects. The students should be able to: - apply the explained technologies to solve business problems - apply emerging technologies to address real world problems - lead projects that utilize emerging technologies - systematically compare different solutions and evaluate possible risks and opportunities.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Performance Management ElectiveV-830-PEMAECTS 3,75
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Auður Arna Arnardóttir
Content
General description Performance Management is the ongoing process of setting objectives and assessing individual and collective behavior and achievements during a finite period of time. The performance management process goes from the macro level (e.g. organizational strategy) to the micro levels (e.g. individual performance improvements), and can be considered to be a four strep process. First, identifying and measuring employee performance, and secondly, diagnosing strengths and possible problems in individual and team performance (e.g. gap analysis). Thirdly it requires giving performance feedback, and finally it requires active steps to strengthen or improve individual or team performance. Performance management is hence primarily about measuring and counseling/giving feedback on ways to improve performance at an individual and team level, and the quality of work relationship. Performance improvement results from people being clear about organizational priorities and objectives and ability to tie that knowledge in with their individual and team priorities and objectives. They are further clear on what skills need to be enhanced, and which types of behavior can help to the end of reaching those priorities and objectives. This comes from open, positive, and constructive discussion between supervisors, individuals and teams, and agreement on how to focus on doing the job better. In the appraisal process, a manager evaluates, coaches, counsels, and develops subordinates on a continuing basis throughout the reporting period, usually one year. The class further focuses on several factors that can influence the process, such as rater errors in performance measurement, electronic monitoring of performance, structured performance improvement programs, and how managers coaching and counseling skills can be improved.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge /Skills Performance Management  Understand the role of performance management for organizational strategy and management  Explain the relationship between organizational objectives and performance management  Describe, identify and critique objective measures of performance  Understand different sources of information (e.g. Managers, peers, subordinates, ...)  Understand rater errors in performance measurement  Understand multi-dimensional models of job performance  Describe competencies and their use in performance management  Describe and evaluate methods of performance appraisal  Understand the importance of goal setting, feedback (appraisal and corrective feedback) and intervention in performance management  Understand how goal setting and feedback can be made more effective in performance management  Describe coaching as a performance improvement intervention  Understand and be able to diagnose performance problems      Evaluate the reasons for employee poor performance and/or absence and identify a range of managerial interventions  Understand when disciplinary proceedings might be invoked in performance disputes  Understand Performance Improvement Programs   Motivation  Understand and be able to define motivation at work  Understand and evaluate need theories of motivation  Understand and evaluate the trait perspective of motivation  Understand and evaluate cognitive theories of motivation: Expectancy theory and Goal setting theory  Understand and evaluate reinforcement theories  Understand how perceptions and equity of different aspects of work affect motivation  Understand the Job Characteristics Model  Understand how motivation can be enhanced through job design   Difficult employees  Define the concepts of stress and engagement at work  Identify the key causes of stress and engagement at work  Understand how to reduce stress and increase engagement at work  Understand Wellness programs / employee assistance programs  Understand and evaluate org. bullying   Incentives, Rewards, Benefits  Understand the use of Compensation  Employee benefits Skills in general  That students can support own reasoning in project outcomes by good use of established knowledge base in the subject areas of performance management.  That students have increased skills in dealing with performance management, through observations, analysis and experimentations. Ability in general  That students can actively show established ability through written and verbal case analysis where the emphasis is on students´ ability to judge, argue, decide, devise, discriminate, plan and predict from material presented or collected.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish
Portfolio Management CoreV-862-PORTECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
David Skovmand
Content
 The purpose of the course is to give students advanced knowledge of systematic and analytical methods of considering and performing investment decisions and the skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: Risk and uncertainty in financial returns, financial performance measurement, basic utility theory, portfolio theory, optimal investment and portfolio choice, efficient frontier, models of the expected return (CAPM and APT), pricing and risk management in bond markets and mutual fund investments.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: At the end of the course students possess in-depth knowledge of:- Key concepts to describe a key characteristics of single financial assets and portfolios of financial assets, including mean, variances, and covariance and correlation for asset returns
- Financial risk measures and basic risk management tools
- Models employing discrete and continuous random variables
- Portfolio theory and utility theory in relation to optimal portfolio choice

Skills:  Students develop skills to:- Estimate mean, variance, covariance, beta and multifactor betas from the historical record of returns
- Apply performance measures to investment decisions
- Apply measures of financial risk
- Characterize the efficient frontier of portfolios
- Apply utility theory in relation to optimal portfolio choice
- Work with factor models such as CAPM and APT in particular the Fama-French 3-factor model
- Apply Excel to solve the problems in particular numerical solution and linear regressionCompetence:  Students develop their competences to:
- Measures and interpret the performance of investment decisions
- Manage individually and in investment management teams portfolios of financial assets
- Identify, justify and implement decisions to optimize portfolio composition

Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Equity Analysis CoreV-863-EQUIECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Már Wolfgang Mixa
Content
 The focus of this course is on the financial analysis and valuation of companies. Therefore the course provides students with essential knowledge in equity valuation and develops skills and competences to apply this knowledge. The following topics and concepts are covered: The course is segmented into major sections. It starts with a discussion of the drivers of corporate value, specifically return on invested capital (ROIC) and organic revenue growth. Based on this, it examines how to build an ROIC-based valuation model in conjunction with a free cash flow to firm (FCFF) model. Following that it covers financial analysis using data from the annual report based on traditional competitive benchmarking and to current metrics such as return on invested capital (ROIC) and economic profit. The primary goal is to build a true understanding of operating performance across business units and for the entire company. Having covered the above elements, the course focuses on building an integrated valuation model using discounted cash flow. This section of the course starts with the fundamentals of forecasting, how to determine the appropriate forecast period, and issues related to continuing value. It covers the weighted average cost of capital, focusing on how to estimate the inputs. The final section discusses alternatives to DCF valuation, such as multiples analysis to triangulate DCF valuation and comparison to investment strategies of major investors.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should:
- Know how to reorganize a financial statement
- Know how to assess past performance
- Know how to evaluate cash flow streams
- Understand the concept of valuation by multiples and how to calculate multiples
- Understand the concept of cost of capital
- Know the potential drivers of corporate value

Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to different setting in equity valuation. The student should:
- Be able to reorganize a financial statement
- Be able to calculate and apply multiples
- Be able to estimate cost of debt, cost of equity and WACC
- Be able to build a robust EP valuation model
- Be able to build a robust FCFF valuation model
- Identify and analyze the drivers of corporate value

Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills in equity valuation. The student should be able to:
- Analyze and interpret past performance
- Evaluate new projects and entire firms from a shareholder’s perspective
- Use results of valuation models in corporate decision making
- Analyze the impact of corporate decisions and of developments in the firm’s environment on corporate value
- Critically assess the limitations valuation models

Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
MSc Thesis ElectiveV-888-THHLECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Páll Melsted Ríkharðsson
Content
No content found.
Learning outcome - Objectives
No objectives found.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish
Research Proposal CoreV-898-REPRECTS 0
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Páll Melsted Ríkharðsson
Content
 The purpose of this course is to guide students through the process of preparing a research proposal for the master´s thesis.
Learning outcome - Objectives
  This course builds on the students´ research-related knowledge, skills and competences and guides them through the preparation of the research proposal for their master´s thesis.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish
MSc Thesis CoreV-898-THESECTS 30
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
Páll Melsted Ríkharðsson
Content

Learning outcome - Objectives
Knowledge: Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should - be able to account for the basic building blocks of a good research project, - understand and account for the empirical conditions in the studied field (e.g. a market and industry), - have a solid understanding of the fundaments of the methodology applied in the thesis (e.g. concepts and techniques), - be able to account for relevant theories concerning the research field, - know what constitutes a good research question. Skills: The ability to apply knowledge to the different tasks of the research process. The student should be able to - demonstrate independence and effectiveness in conducting the thesis research, - develop an effective research question and setting a clear focus of the thesis, - adopt, adapt and argue for a relevant methodology, - critically analyse empirical data, - discuss independently implications of results/analysis on relevant theory, - provide answer(s) to stated research question(s), - discuss possible implications of results, for example, for managers in a relevant industry. Competences: The ability to apply knowledge and skills. At the end of the thesis-process, students should be able to - design basic research projects, - conduct basic independent research, - systematically evaluate research in their field of expertise, - communicate and apply expert knowledge gained from the thesis process.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Exchange Studies ElectiveX-699-EXCHECTS 30
Year1. year
SemesterFall 2019
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
No content found.
Learning outcome - Objectives
No objectives found.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionIcelandic
Vorönn/Spring 2020
Integrated Project I; Conceive and Design ElectiveT-800-INT1ECTS 8
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
Technology does not exist in isolation but is dependent upon natural sciences, technical feasibility and market need. This is what makes technological development challenging but if it is successful in integrating these factors it can be very rewarding. The objective of this course is to give the student a comprehensive experience of combining these factors for technological innovation, develpment and marketing. To accomplish this, students will go through the conceive, design and parts of implement and operate process with the aim to ensure technical feasability and to target market need.
The course will cover innovation, entrepreneurship and writing a complete businesplan for a „start up“ of a technical idea, in light of market needs, research, technical development, planning and financial presumptions. We deal with the terms innovation and entrepreneurship and their significance for modern management. We also cover the value of knowledge, intellectual property and patent rights.
The course will also give an overview of the importance of continuous innovation through technical development processes and market need analysis in relation to product and corporate lifecycles.

Learning outcome - Objectives
After the course the student shall be able to explain the following terms: Business plan, market analysis, technical feasibility, financial models and profitability.
Disciplinary skills: On the completion of the course the student shall be able to formulate technically complex ideas and develop and implement them for a competative market. The student will learn how to develop ideas through the Canvas method, build a buisness plan, execute a feasibility study, carry out a financial plan and test the idea developing and using a prototype.
 
Skills: Students shall be able to adapt the most important methods in optimizing business opportunities by analysing current situation and suggesting methods and actions that are likely to lead to optimal results in Innovation. Also students shall be able to describe how to realize their proposals.Personal skills:
  • Apply engineering methods to complex projects, i.e. have the ability to assess engineering projects, identify the key factors in a given situation, and develop an approach to solution.
  • Formulate and work on open-ended problems, including creative thinking.
  • Realize the limits of his/her expertise and know when it is necessary and appropriate to seek specialist advice.
  • Manage and motivate people by disciplines of human resource management and provide leadership.
Interpersonal skills
  • Communicate effectively and professionally and formulate sound arguments, both in writing and by means of presentations, using appropriate professional language, including statistics, figures, illustrations, equations, tables and video.
  • Use time management and work planning related to the organization, implementation and successful completion and reporting of a project.
  • Be an effective team member and contribute to the management of team projects.
  • Recognize the interdisciplinary nature of technical problems and work with other professions to arrive at a solution for complex engineering problems.
  • Propose, plan, structure and manage well defined projects involving a team of individuals from different professional disciplines. Prioritize, organize and schedule work activities effectively.
Possess the knowledge to present and interpret the outcome of a business plan and be able to establish and/or operate minor companies.
Participate in research and product development within the broad field of engineering, recognizing their roles in the innovation process.
Know how to avoid making mistakes when searching, developing and evaluating business  opportunities.

Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionIcelandic
Global Issues in Travel and Tourism ElectiveV-711-GLTTECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
 Tourism is the world´s largest industry.  As future managers, students will learn the value of understanding how tourism affects both travelers, businesses, and communities in complex and contentious ways throughout the world in order to make informed leadership decisions at work and in their personal travel. 
Learning outcome - Objectives
The student should have an understanding of concepts such as:
- how global tourism brings travelers, businesses, and host communities into close contact and the issues this creates;
-the presentation of western ideals and images in non-western countries and how tourism affects this;
-the political and ethical dilemmas of tourism.The student should develop the ability to apply their knowledge to:
-discuss, write and present on the issues and negative consequences of travel and tourism in the world
-discuss, write and present on how responsible travel, when planned and carried out according to ethical principles and guidelines, can be a force of change
-discuss, write and present on how tourism can introduce travelers to other cultures, improve living conditions of local residents, protect local environments, resources, and lifestyles, and build business.The student should apply their knowledge and skills to:
- inform decisions based on how travel and tourism is a major force of social, economic, cultural, and environmental change.
- document, present, and advocate for decisions based on how travel and tourism is a major force of social, economic, cultural, and environmental change.
Course assessment
 Learning activities throughout the semester lead to a final paper and presentation that synthesizes class content. Students will also create a personal ethical travel statement and responsible tourism statement for a business.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
 Class content will be presented through text readings, video presentations, and class lectures. Learning activities will be student-led, rely heavily on readings, group discussions, and in-class activities.
Language of instructionEnglish
Consumer Behavior ElectiveV-712-COBEECTS 3,75
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
Consumer behavior is everywhere and the demand for consumer oriented thinking is ever increasing. In this course, we go through the fundaments of consumer behavior and try to understand the consumer both as an individual and in a group. The first part of the course is dedicated to the individual and the psychological factors that influence our behavior such as attention, learning, emotions etc. In the second part, we study consumer decision making, i.e. how consumers purchase products and services, and what factors influence their decisions. In the third part, we put consumer behavior in a practical context and study how companies and governments can influence and nudge consumers. We will also reflect on the ethical aspects of influencing consumer behavior. 
Learning outcome - Objectives
The student should be able to describe:
- The fundamentals of consumer psychology, including attention, perception, learning, memory,   attitudes, emotion and motivation.
- Tthe main theories of consumer decision making.
- How companies and governments use consumer behavior research to nudge and influence consumers.
- How consumers influence each other, the society, and the environment through their actions.
The student should be able to ability to apply knowledge to:
- Explain concrete examples of consumer behavior in behavioral and psychological terms.
- Predict how consumers will behave in a concrete situation based on consumer behavior theory. 
- Evaluate business and policy actions from a consumer perspective.
- Identify ways to influence or change consumer behavior.
The student should be able to apply knowledge and skills to:
- Adopt and advocate for consumer oriented thinking in business and policy situations.
- Provide input to the development of consumer products and services.
- Critically reflect on the ethicality of consumer related business and government actions.  
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
The course is based on lectures, group work, class discussion and individual exercises. Active participation is crucial to the learning outcome.
Language of instructionEnglish
Innovation Management ElectiveV-713-INNMECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
 The course consists of three modules. The first module focuses on types of innovation, innovation ecosystems and traditional and more recent methods for managing innovation. The second module focuses on open innovation in its many forms and narrative methods. The third module consists of student presentations of their final assignments and critical analysis and discussion.
Learning outcome - Objectives
The student should be able to describe:
• Different types of innovation and innovation ecosystems
• Traditional and more recent methods for innovation management and the differences and similarities among these methods
• The concept of open innovation and its multiple manifestations
• The differences among, and relative strengths of, methods of presenting innovation ideas and solutions
The student should be able to ability to apply knowledge to:
• Assess the type(s) and core of specific innovations
• Identify and describe innovation ecosystems
• Distinguish among methods for innovation management and select appropriate methods for different innovation projects
• Critically evaluate open innovation options for innovation projects
• Frame the description of an innovation idea or solution as a story
The ability to apply knowledge and skills: The student should be able to
• Identify the position of an innovation within one or more ecosystems
• Organize and lead an innovation project using a variety of innovation methods
• Decide on the merits of open innovation approaches and implement them where appropriate
• Craft a narrative story describing a new innovation or innovation project
Course assessment
 Student grades will be based on three assignments to be completed during the course as well as class participation.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
 Lectures, in-class exercises, discussions and assignments.
Language of instructionEnglish
Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Context ElectiveV-715-ENICECTS 3,75
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
The course covers the fundamental concepts of how to start a startup. The objective of this class is to change the mindset that entrepreneurship, starting and running your own business is risky and only a selected few can do it. Student will leave the class with the mindset that entrepreneurship is a viable career choice. At the end of this class, students should feel that they have the tool set, knowledge and practical know-how on how to start a startup. The class will also showcase the “Whys” and “Hows” of building a business, the sequence of building a business and challenge the students to actually take the plunge in doing the actual task of building a business. The classroom sessions will be more run like workshops where all the students are participating in the activity on schedule.
The class will challenge students to think like a contrarian in building a business using the approach of startup thinking. The conventional wisdom on how to build a business does not work in the context of hyper competition and globalization. The challenge is not limited to businesses; the challenge is applicable to every person. Everyone can be a startup founder and entrepreneur; actually we all were before the agrarian and the industrial revolution. The notion of a job was non-existent. We will explore how anyone can build a unique and valuable business as long as they subscribe to the notion that it has to be something different, unique but grounded in the present. Future will not get automatically better, it gets better through the collective efforts of founders and entrepreneurs who move the human race forward and we will explore the methodologies that allows us to learn the path of company building.

Learning outcome - Objectives
The student should be able to describe:
- The concept of startup thinking or entrepreneurship
- The concept of innovation and technology
- The scope of innovation and technology in the context of starting a new ventureThe student should be able to ability to apply knowledge to:
- Come up with new ideas to solve problems in the context of starting a business
- Build teams
- Apply technology to build products and services
- Articulate and clarify the problems and solutions in the context of a startup or a business
- Apply the sequence of how to build a startup
- Build traction for their products and services
- Build a business modelThe student should be able to apply knowledge and skills to:
- Start their own venture
- Build a value proposition for a problem in the context of entrepreneurship
- Pitch and present their startup or business
Course assessment
Class participation, Team self assessment, Blog posts and grading on final presentation
Individuals
- Personal Blog, Brand creation and quality of questions in the classroom (20%)
- 1 page narratives on each of the above topics through their personal blog (30%)Group (50%)
- Build a team and a company website (5%)
- Build a fan base for the product (10%)
- Build a company pitch deck (10%)
- Completed Business Model Canvas (5%)
- Completed Value Proposition Design (5%)
- Decide on CEO, COO, CTO and CMO and narrate the thinking behind the decision (1%)
- Decide on how the Stock of the company should be split and narrate the thinking behind the decision (1%)
- How does the team allocate the stock option pool and narrate the thinking behind the decision (1%)
- Narrative on building a company culture (2%)
- Narrative on the ideal operating system (culture, habits, rituals) for the company (10%)
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
Lectures, workshops, blog writing, project work and final presentation
Language of instructionEnglish
Business Process Management ElectiveV-716-BPMAECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
Business Process Management (BPM) is an interdisciplinary approach to the analysis, design, implementation, and improvement of organizational work processes and supporting IT systems. The goal of BPM is to increase operational efficiency and effectiveness (e.g., product/service quality, compliance) by understanding a company as a system of business processes, instead of functional departments only. This course covers all phases of the BPM lifecycle, from process identification over modeling, analysis, redesign, automation, to process monitoring and performance management. In addition, strategic (e.g., alignment, governance) and social (e.g., people, culture) factors of BPM will be covered. In interactive sessions students will learn state-of-the-process analysis methods and tools (e.g., process modeling with BPMN, process simulation with ARENA) and study real-world case studies related to process-oriented management methodologies like Six Sigma and Lean Management.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by the degree holder. Knowledge can both be theoretical and applied. The student should be able to:

1.     Identify and characterize the key ideas of process thinking (e.g., organizing firms in processes instead of organizational functions)

2.     Describe and explain the phase of the Business Process Management lifecycle (e.g., from process discovery over design to monitoring and controlling)

3.     Identify and discuss additional factors relevant for Business Process Management (e.g., strategic alignment, organizational culture)
Entail the ability to apply knowledge. Skills can indicate general skills that are not limited to a certain scientific field or profession, as well as specific skills. The student should be able to:

1.     Identify the differences between process-oriented management approaches and other approaches to management

2.     Choose and apply process analysis and design methods (e.g., process modeling, process simulation) to existing business processes

3.     Analyze the business impact of Business Process Management

Entail the ability to apply knowledge and skills to work and study. The student should be able to:

1.     Improve the efficiency and effectiveness of an organization by applying the ideas of Business Process Management
2.     Organize Business Process Management programs and projects
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Fixed Income Analysis ElectiveV-716-FINCECTS 3,75
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
Fixed income is among the major financial pillars in every civilized society. This course is set to support students in having applicable knowledge of most types of fixed income instruments (bonds), not only how to price them and evaluate the pricing in the markets, but also to determine possible pros and cons of different types of fixed income instruments
Learning outcome - Objectives
Students should be able to describe:
• The most common types of fixed income markets, including government bonds and corporate bonds.
• The most important aspects regarding the evaluation of bonds.
• Portfolio management of fixed income securities and drivers of performance, including the duration effects.

The student should be able to:
• Quantify the price sensitivity of bonds
• Analyze various features of bonds
• Determine the valuation for fixed income securities.
• Apply basic tools such as Excel to analyze bond prices and other tools as well.
The student should be able to apply knowledge and skills to critically:
• Analyze and strategically weigh different types of bonds both in Iceland and in foreign markets.
• Evaluate the pros and cons associated with different bond classes and time structures in a broader context.
• Weigh risks in relation to bond investments.
Course assessment
The final grade will be based on four parts, with the following weights:Class participation                  10%Mid-term exam:                      20%A home assignment:               20%Final exam:                             50%
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Management control ElectiveV-717-CPMAECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
No content found.
Learning outcome - Objectives
No objectives found.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish
Implementation of information systems ElectiveV-717-IMISECTS 3,75
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
Information systems are vital for modern businesses. Information and the ability to process information are vital to exploit own resources, optimize production, and reach customers and other stakeholders. Many new business models are enabled by new forms of information processing, and all businesses need to continuously update their information systems (IS) to optimize their business performance. This process crosses the border of business and IT, and interdisciplinary skills are needed.This course focuses on the different phases of Information Systems Implementation. The course will tackle the main phases of IS implementation: Decision Making, IS project management (including IS the organization of IS development), and related organizational changes necessary to capitalize on new technologies. The course focuses on the challenges that organizations face in practice and how to cope with the complexities. The course introduces a range of methods and techniques that can be used to understand, plan and execute IS Implementations to enable students to participate in development, acquisition and implementation of IS.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should be able to:    •       Describe the role of IT in changing organizations    •       Know the main (IT) project management tools and their function    •       Describe the dynamics of IT related change The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks related to implementation of information systems. The student should be able to:    •       Critically asses the relevance and value of information systems in different social and economic contexts.    •       Identify the information needs of organisational decision makers and address them through the selection and deployment of information systems.    •       Analyse organizational change processes related to IT implementation.    The ability to apply knowledge and skills in implementation of information systems. The student should be able to:    •       Assess and plan information system implementation projects and the related organizational change dynamics.    •       Analyse ongoing and plan future IT implementation projects and identify potential causes of friction and related remedies.
Course assessment
Active Participation (20%)The participation grade takes note of the student’s presence in class. Evaluation of students’ active participation, which activates concepts/theories from the syllabus, supports arguments, demonstrates critical thinking, skills and reflections (see learning outcomes).Participation in Simulation (20%)The students will be engaged in a simulation of IT-Driven change. The purpose of the simulation is to teach the students in a pragmatic way the different tools for carrying out IT-driven change and the dynamic effects of these tools. The simulation will take place on the last day of the course. Presence and active participation is required to obtain the grade.Final exam (60%)The final exam is a written, individual exam. The exam is open-book and designed as a take-home exam from 08:00 to 23:59 (16h).  It requires the students to perform an analysis of a case study using concepts and theories from the course. The exam is tightly aligned with learning outcomes and exercises conducted in class.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
Teaching will be a combination of different approaches: lectures from teacher; lectures from guest lecturers-practitioners; case discussions and exercises. The teaching design relies on the students’ active participation and good preparation. The teaching methods reflect the stated learning outcomes of the course.
Language of instructionEnglish
Entrepreneurial Finance CoreV-733-ENTRECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
This course provides an overview of the entrepreneurial finance process. It covers a wide range of topics associated with a venture’s financial strategy: financial planning, sources of capital, exit strategies, financial contracting, and valuation. It focuses on integrating and extending one’s basic knowledge of finance principles with the complexities that entrepreneurship, business strategy, and marketing add to the context of new ventures. The fundamental premise of the course is that financial strategy formulation and implementation is a crucial part of the venture development process. As such, the course is suitable for those who plan to engage in new venture development both as an independent effort and within a corporate or family business context. I expect that students taking this course will have an understanding of some of the basic finance such as financial statement preparation and discounted cash flow analysis.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students.
The student should:
•Identify different funding options.
•Describe the elements of a new venture’s business and financial model.
•Explain the key issues associated with financial planning and fundraising in a new venture context.
 The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks of the entrepreneurial finance process.
The student should:
•Analyze relevant issues in situations at the intersection of entrepreneurship and finance.
•Categorize the uncertainties / risks associated with the development of new ventures.
•Compare different funding options.
The ability to apply knowledge and skills in entrepreneurial finance settings.
The student should:
•Evaluate investment proposals.
•Formulate financial plans.
•Design investment proposals.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
International and labour economics ElectiveV-733-ILECECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
This course is intended for students in Human Resource Management and Organisational Psychology while students in other programs are welcome. In today’s globalized world the links between labor markets and international trade are very strong and the tools of economics apply equally to both.
In this course we start by discussing the basic ideas of economics, demand and supply and the gains from trade. Then we will take this analysis further and look at how the basic tools of economics apply to labor markets and in the international context. When looking at labor markets we will focus on how labor markets operate and how that relates to what goes on inside the firm. The tools of economics are used to analyze employer and employee decisions, and the institutional factors shaping those decisions, such as unions and employer federations. When looking at the international context we will add trade between countries and exchange rates.
Among topics discussed are employee supply of labor, employer demand for labor, education and training, the role of unions, worker rights and government policy, employee involvement and participation, discrimination, unemployment, income inequality, international trade and competition, exchange rates, real and nominal, and the role of international treaties.
Learning outcome - Objectives
After finishing the course:Students should posess general knowledge and insights of the main theories and concepts of labor economics.

Students should have knowledge and understanding of terms used in labor economics such as labor demand and labor supply, elasticity, indifference curves, human capital, unemployment, and discrimination.

 Students should understand the main factors affecting demand and supply both in general markets as well as in the labor market.

Students should know what distinguishes labor markets from other markets.Students should be able to apply the basic tools of labor economics.

Students should be able to analyze the effects of various changes, including policy, to supply and demand for labor.

Students should be able to draw and explain the models used in labor economics, such as supply and demand, budget constraints and indifference curves. Students should understand the role of government and international institutions in the labor market.Students should have the skills to analyze economic problems that apply to the labor market.
Students should be able to understand which tool to apply to each problem and be able to separate the major factors of the problem from the minor factors.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Branding and Strategic Marketing ElectiveV-741-BRANECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
The aim of the course is to provide an advanced understanding of brand management and strategic marketing. In the beginning, students will advance their understanding of key concepts and methods mostly focusing on marketing strategy with emphasis on choosing the right marketing metrics for different companies and industries. This beginning part of the course will be conducted by combining short lectures with cases, with an emphasis on the latter. The course is designed to help students develop a conceptual framework and marketing dashboard when making a marketing and/or branding decision. The cases will focus on service, tourism, digital marketing and luxury brands. As the course progresses more emphasis will be put on activities to review, build, measure and manage brand equity though a large project on brand auditing and strategic marketing. Students will also be given the opportunity to study a relevant topic of their choice with some depth in a critical literature review. The supplementary readings will present essential marketing strategy and branding techniques for measuring and monitoring everything from brand equity to social media marketing. By the end of the course students should have an advanced understanding of strategic marketing and brand management and be able analyse both marketing decision making as well as brand management from a clear conceptual framework.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by the degree holder. Knowledge can both be theoretical and applied. The student should:

 

1.     Understand the importance of key marketing metrics and branding conceptualisation

2.     Be able to place the latest knowledge in context within their field

3.    Be able to account for selected concepts, theories, methods and practice in both marketing strategy and branding (see e.g. the aim of the course and the course outline)

4.     Have knowledge of ethical problems in strategic marketing and brand management

Entail the ability to apply knowledge. Skills can indicate general skills that are not limited to a certain scientific field or profession, as well as specific skills.

 

1.     Be able to discuss the strength and weakness related to the concepts, theories, methods and practice

2.     Can understand and tackle issues in strategic marketing and branding in a professional context

3.     Can collect, analyse and evaluate scientific papers and data for strategic marketing and/or for brand auditing

4.     Are innovative in developing and applying ideas in branding

5.     Can develop branding projects or marketing strategyImproved management decision-making and the ability to provide relevant, accurate, and timely information to a marketing problem.

Entail the ability to apply knowledge and skills to work and study.

 

1.     Have developed the necessary learning skills and independence for further studies

2.     Can initiate and implement marketing strategy and/or brand management

3.     Are capable of presenting and describing marketing management issues and research findings in English

4.   Can write business texts in English.

5.     Can evaluate the suitability of the different methods and scientific issues in branding and marketing strategy
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Strategic HRM and Metrics ElectiveV-745-STRAECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
 This course is designed as a platform for integration and application of various concepts, theories and frameworks in the field of HRM and OP and from other courses in the program. The strategic fit or alignment of HRM strategy and practices to organizational strategic goals, and HRM´s contribution to performance through value creation, are central to this course. The focus is on content, context and process considerations including formulation, decision making, implementation and evaluation processes for strategically aligned HR strategy and HR metrics. Basic concepts and key frameworks to analyse competitive and complex organizational environment will be introduced. Participant´s will also be exposed to various trends and contextual issues faced by organizations and HR professionals in a complex, competitive and ever evolving environment. The firm´s HR architecture, along with theories relating to HRM´s strategic role, business partnership and HR value proposition, will be covered. Various models, perspectives and stakeholders will be taken into account. 
Learning outcome - Objectives
Understand the complexities in HR and business strategy development, implementation and evaluation.

Understand and explain key terms and frameworks relating to strategy development and implementation.

Conceptually understand and explain key theories and frameworks relating to stragetical alignment of HR strategy and HR metrics.
Describe and apply key HR models, frameworks and concepts and use them to effectively analyse various situation and organizations.

Develop strategically relevant and organizationally aligned HR metrics to evaluate HR effectiveness and contribution to organizations.

To use concepts, framework, theories and research results to build up a rationale for decision making in HR.
To think analytically, systematically and strategically about aspects of managing human and social capital in organizational settings.

Actively participate and contribute in the analysis and developmental stages of an organizational business strategy.

Take on a leading role in the systematic and critical analysis, development and design of an integrated and strategically aligned HR strategy and HR metrics.

 
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Business Research Methodology ElectiveV-746-REMEECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
The course covers relevant research methodologies used in business research, principles, practices and issues of quantitative and qualitative research and approaches to extend knowledge of research methodology and methods. Thus, the overall purpose of the course is to prepare students for conducting own research projects.

The course will:
• Advance theoretical knowledge, practical skills and competences in quantitative and qualitative research
• Encourage students to think critically and incorporate tools and skills into their research
• Provide students with an understanding of how to ensure high quality and practice in doing quantitative and qualitative research
Learning outcome - Objectives
The student should
Be able to explain the fundamentals in research ethics and in philosophy of research
Understand main qualitative and quantitative empirical methods for business research
Recognize and understand the research methods in state-of-the art research papers and articles
Be familiar with relevant statistical software packages and qualitative data analysis software packages
The student should
Recognize ethical difficulties in research
Plan and organize a research process
Link research methods to theory in their field of business studies
Identify and analyze relevant data for research projects
Utilize relevant software packages
The student should
Formulate and justify relevant research questions and research design
Apply quantitative and qualitative research methodology
Interpret, critically evaluate and communicate research results
Reflect on the limitations of research design and methodology
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities

Language of instructionEnglish
Cases in corporate finance CoreV-763-COR2ECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of course5. Second cycle, intermediate
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesV-755-CORP, Corporate Finance
Schedule3 sessions, 16 hours each
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
This course focuses on applying the theories, models, and tools covered in V–755–CORP Corporate Finance. Real-life cases are analyzed and used to identify information that is necessary for managerial decision making and to develop suggestions and solutions for actual decision making in the context of corporate finance. The cases focus on various areas within the field of corporate finance, e.g. cost of capital, cash flow estimation, valuation.

Learning outcome - Objectives
Upon completion of the course students have a deep knowledge of solving corporate finance cases. This includes:

•Combine and apply insight from corporate finance to perform accurate and correct calculations and to show and explain all relevant calculations. •State the assumptions behind the theories / methods / models used. •Independently combine and logically structure the corporate finance vocabulary / theories / methods / models / regulatory/institutional/ practical knowledge, and empirical evidence to solve the corporate finance cases. Students develop their skills to create value. This is done by: •Solving complex real life corporate finance problems. •Presenting their results in front of an audience. •Participating in discussions (active participation). Students develop their competencies to act as managers by solving real life problems.

Course assessment
•             Students are divided into four groups. Note: Number of groups may change according to the number of students attending the course. •             Each group is responsible for presenting one case in the classroom (20% weight in the final grade). •             Each group hand in four full case answers to the four cases (15% weight in the final grade each). Each group is not allowed to work together with other groups, and each group is not allowed to receive any form of help (honor code). The completed answer by each group must not exceed 8 pages (12 pt, 1.5 line distance, and standard page) exclusive front page, and bibliography in total. To prevent plagiarism and copying all assignments should be passed through Turn-It-In. Each group upload a PDF version of their assignments (case answers) in Canvas AND in Turn-It-In AND send a copy to cp.fi@cbs.dk. Each group does not need to upload the Turn-It-In report in Canvas. I will log on Turn-It-In after the submission deadline and see the originality report. The benefit for students is that you do not need to worry about the time it takes for Turn-It-In to generate the report that eventually could bring you into trouble with respect to the deadline. The deadline for submission / upload: TBA at noon GMT.•             In group work everybody shall make his/her own contribution. The group itself cannot be held responsible for anyone not contributing to the overall success of the group but benefitting from the group’s work. RU requires that students always put forth their best effort in group work and make sure that their contribution is equivalent to that of others. If a group member does not contribute appropriately, the group shall notify the respective student of their displeasure sufficiently long before the group work ends so that the situation can be rectified. If the opinion of the group is that a group member, in spite of criticism from the others in the group, has not contributed sufficiently, the group shall notify their instructor who shall then, depending on circumstances, confer with the Program Council on possible solutions to the matter. Instructors are allowed to give different grades to group members when there is reason to believe that contributions differ greatly. •             Students are responsible for submitting/uploading assignments. The deadline is not extended. An instructor is allowed to lower the grade of students who submit assignments too late and not accept assignments, if they are submitted exceedingly late. In this course you will get 0 for an assignment handed in too late. •             Individual class participation (20% weight in the final grade). If you do not show up in class you do not contribute to the discussion in class and the learning in the classroom. Therefore, no show results in a lower grade than if you show up and make points in class. If the weighted average of your six grades is at least 6.0 you have passed the course
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
In general, the seminars are structured as follows:•Lectures.•Student presentation (group basis) of the cases and class discussions.•Feedback from lecturer on written cases handed in by students on a group basis.•Company visit and insight into how corporate finance work / is used in practice in Iceland. •Guest speaker gives a speech on a core area within corporate finance.
Language of instructionEnglish
Financial Reporting and Accounting Standards II ElectiveV-765-FIR2ECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of course5. Second cycle, intermediate
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesV-759-FIR1, Financial Accounting Practice and Standards I
ScheduleFour lectures pr. week.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with an extensive knowledge of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and the Icelandic Financial Statements Act and to develop students’ skills and competences to apply this knowledge. Extensive analysis will be made of the main principles of various IFRS standards as endorsed by the EU and the laws and regulations governing the preparation of financial statements based on the provisions of the Icelandic Financial Statements Act. The following topics and concepts are covered:Presentational demands of IFRS for financial statements, substantive rules with respect to specific topics, including  share-based payments (IFRS 2), earnings per share (IAS 33), leases (IFRS 16), fair value measurement (IFRS 13), related parties (IAS 24), investment properties (IAS 40), Segment reporting (IFRS 8), foreign currency transactions (IAS 21), non-current assets held for sale and discontinued operations (IFRS 5), separate financial statements (IAS 27) and borrowing costs (IAS 23).
Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students. The student should: - Be familiar with the main principles of the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) covered in the course.- Be familiar with the Icelandic Financial Statements Act.- Understand the responsibilities in financial reporting.- Understand potential conflicts of interest and ethical issues regarding financial reporting.- Since this course is a continuation of the course „Gerð reikningsskila og staðlar um reikningsskil I“ students are expected to gain a deeper knowledge of some of the contents covered in that course, as well as gaining new and deep knowledge on other matters not covered in the previous course. The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks of financial reporting. The student should:- Be able to identify the relevant IFRS and/or national rules for different financial reporting issues.- Be able to identify ethical issues regarding financial reporting.-Be able to solve financial reporting issues not otherwisedcovered in class by applying their knowledge to new tasks.
The ability to apply knowledge and skills in financial reporting. The student should: - Be able to take part in a professional discussion on financial reporting.- Apply relevant IFRS and/or national rules for different financial reporting issues.- Be able to justify the use of a specific IFRS or national rules for specific reporting issues.
Course assessment
Four group assignments, each 10.0% and total of 40.0% Participation grade, 5.0%  (based on attending lectures and active participation in class).
Final exam 55%
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
Lectures on theory, explanation of approaches, techniques, exercise sessions and responses to questions from students. The teaching methods rely on the students’ active participation and good preparation before class.
Language of instructionIcelandic
Applied Derivatives CoreV-766-APDEECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of course4. Second cycle, introductory
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesV-755-CORP, Corporate Finance
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
Derivatives are widely known financial instruments that can be used very effectively to hedge against or speculate on any financial markets risks/behaviour. Derivatives also have had the bad rap as the weapons of the mass destruction (courtesy of Warren Buffet). This course will cover the practical applications of basic building blocks of derivatives (i.e. forwards, futures, swaps and options) and then use the options as the base to construct other more useful, effective and powerful risk-management and speculation options. In addition, the course will discuss the valuation (or quantification of the risks underlying) these options using spreadsheets (including the construction of zero rate curves and volatility term structures). Time permitting, the course will also discuss a few case studies on how these are applied in practice.
Learning outcome - Objectives
The student should understand:
•How to build a zero curve using bonds and money market instruments?
•The concept of the basic building blocks of derivatives (forwards, futures, swaps and options) from both a practical and theoretical perspective.
•Risks arising from the transaction of derivative instruments in the equity, currency, interest rate markets.
•How to go about quantifying the risks underlying many standard derivative contracts using Excel Spreadsheet.
•How to go about using derivatives in practice to hedge and/or speculate.
The student should be able to
•Build an approximate zero curve that can used as inputs to value the derivatives and embedded derivatives
•Qualitatively understand the risk exposures arising from financial transactions
•Build a simple pricing tool in Excel so as to be able to approximately quantify the risks that has been qualitatively understood

The student should be able to:
•Value most derivatives contracts in the equity and currency markets.
•Value simple derivatives contracts in the interest rate markets.
•Quantify financial risks any corporation is exposed to using a what-if-scenario analysis
•Create a customized derivatives hedge to mitigate financial risks
•Export these concepts understand/appreciate and solve problems in other markets not discussed in class (e.g. Oil, electricity, weather etc.)
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
Teaching will be done using a combination of approaches ranging from lectures to case studies to discussions to class exercises and group presentations. The teaching will rely on the students’ active participation and good preparation. The teaching methods reflect the stated learning outcomes of the course.
Language of instructionEnglish
Consolidated Financial Statements ElectiveV-767-SAREECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of course5. Second cycle, intermediate
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleFour lectures pr. week
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
This course focuses on the various accounting issues in respect of typical business combinations and consolidated financial statements including:
•         Accounting for goodwill on acquisition of a subsidiary and/or a business;
•         Preparation of a Consolidated Statement of Financial Position (C-SOFP);
•         Preparation of a Consolidated Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income (C-SPLOCI); and
•         Preparation of a Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows (C-SOCF).More complex matters will also be considered like accounting for associates, accounting for joint arrangements (including joint operations and joint ventures), and consolidation of foreign subsidiaries.
The accounting framework that will be used for this course will be International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). The course will also consider additional reporting requirements as stipulated by the Financial Statements Act No.3/2006.  The main IFRS Standards covered include:
•         IFRS 3: Business Combinations
•         IFRS 10: Consolidated Financial Statements
•         IFRS 11: Joint Arrangements
•         IFRS 12: Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities
•         IAS 7: Statement of Cashflows
•         IAS 21: The Effects of Changes in Foreign Exchange Rates
•         IAS 27: Separate Financial Statements
•         IAS 28: Investments in Associates

The book Financial Accounting and Reporting by Elliott & Elliott, 18th Edition, Pearson Publications, will be used for this course. The following chapters will be covered:
•         Accounting for groups at the date of acquisition (Ch.22)
•         Preparation of Consol-SOFP after date of acquisition (Ch.23)
•         Preparation of Consol-SPLOCI, Consol-SOCE, Consol-SOCF (Ch.24)
•         Accounting for associates and joint arrangements (Ch. 25)
Learning outcome - Objectives
On successful completion of this module candidates will have enhanced their knowledge of:
•         Financial statements and reporting for groups;
•         Accounting issues that are specific to associate undertakings, joint arrangements and overseas subsidiary undertakings;
•         IFRS that are relevant for consolidation,; and
•         Relevant legislation.


Students will have enhanced their skills
•         to understand consolidated financial statements;
•         to identify, develop and critically assess solutions for accounting issues that are specific to consolidated financial statements, in accordance with IFRS and relevant legislation; and
•         to identify conflicts of interest in relation to accounting practices.



Course assessment
Participation (10%)
The participation grade takes note of the student’s presence in class but more importantly it is an evaluation of students’ active participation. This means partaking in class discussions, asking questions of the lecturer, and attempting to answer questions posed by the lecturer. Note that active participation does not consider the calibre of opinions offered, answers provided, or questions asked. Instead, the lecturer will only consider students’ individual efforts to contribute to an open and dynamic learning environment.
Individual Assignments (5% + 5%)
Students will receive two online tests, one at the end of the February teaching period and one at the end of the March teaching period. The tests will cover the main topics covered during each teaching period. The tests will be “Stop/Go” type; a minimum mark of 60% will be required to pass each test but students will be able to retake each test as often as they want until the required pass mark is achieved. Once the required pass mark is achieved students will be assigned the full 5% of credit attributable to each test.
Group Assignment (20%)
A Group Assignment will be issued following completion of the first teaching period in February. Students will be assigned into group sizes of 3. Further information on the group assignment will be provided as the course progresses.
Final exam (60%)
The final exam will be 3 hours in duration. The exam will be split into two sections, A & B. Section A will be compulsory and comprise 70% of the exam. Section B will require students to answer one question from two presented and will comprise the remaining 30% of the exam. Further information on the final exam will be provided as the course progresses.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
Overall, the teaching methods will reflect the stated learning outcomes of the course. Teaching will be a combination of different approaches including lectures, case discussions, tutorials and exercises. The teaching relies on the students’ active participation and effective preparation.
Language of instructionEnglish
Business research methodology in accounting and finance CoreV-782-BRMAECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
No content found.
Learning outcome - Objectives
No objectives found.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish
Business Intelligence and Analytics ElectiveV-784-REK5ECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesV-715-ABIN, Advanced Business Informatics
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
In the modern business world, decisions can no longer be solely based on gut feelings and personal data. Rapid changes in customer preferences, unlimited access to information, mounting competitor pressures and evolving technology, make decision support for managers a critical function in every company. The field of business intelligence (BI), analytics and decision support systems has evolved from personal support tools to company wide applications, technology solutions, functions and competencies.
This course deals with the technologies, competencies and solutions that support managerial work and decision making. The course provides a theoretical basis of decision making, describes how information technology can support and improve such decision making, what types of decision support systems there are, the nature and evolution of business intelligence, the tools and techniques of managerial decision support and describes some of the emerging technologies and trends in the business.The course discusses the following parts:·      Managerial and decision support – Theoretical discussions and basis·      Discussions about data assets, ethical concerns of managing and controlling information·      Managing and measuring the quality of data·      Data Warehousing, fundamentals of data modeling and the handling of master data·      Fundamental concepts of datamining, artificial intelligence, machine learning and data predictions·      Business performance management, analytics and reporting and its relation to data management and decision making·      Various emerging trends in the BI business.The course should provide the student with a framework to understand decision support and business intelligence solutions, -work and projects. Based on textbook readings, cases and projects the student learns to apply this framework. The course will focus on generic approaches to decision support and business intelligence but will also include discussions on real life examples from Icelandic as well as foreign companies. Furthermore, there are planned sessions with companies which will describe their experiences with implementing decision support, business intelligence and performance management solutions.Please note that this course contains fair amount of technical details and -discussion. Experience has shown that the material is better suited for students with some prior knowledge and preparation from IT related courses or similar experience from work. 
Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students.
The student should be able to:
• Identify the major frameworks of computerized decision support, decision support systems (DSS), data analytics and business intelligence (BI).
• Describe the nature of information and data, explain their basic difference and its use in managerial decision making
• Explain the context and importance of gathering and managing data in the society and economy.
• Describe the core concepts of decision making and discuss how IT systems can support effective decision making.
• Discuss and know the main building blocks of data management systems as well as List the definitions, concepts, and architectures of data warehousing
• Describe the basic concepts of advanced analytics methods and understand their application
• Identify the major ethical and legal issues of analytics and data management
Skills:
During the course, student will have acquired the skills to perform various tasks of a BI and Information management specialists. The student should:
• Be able to critically evaluate strengths and weaknesses of BI projects
• Know the basic building blocks of a good BI program and how to apply them correctly
• Gathered knowhow on basic BI tools and evaluate their fit for purpose
• Know BI project best practices for BI projects and know how to apply them        
Competences:
The student will have acquired the ability to apply knowledge and skills in Business Intelligence projects and regular business settings. The student should be able to:
• Effectively communicate course work in writing and oral presentation.
• Participate actively in BI projects and be ready to apply best practices BI work
• Make judgement on quality of data and assess the its impact on decision making.
• Create and participate in data quality projects through various roles
• Participate in gathering information on and create high quality KPIs
• Act as an active member BI teams focusing on information management
Course assessment
Participation and attendance – 20%Mid term project – 30%-Final exam – 50%
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
Teaching will be combined of various approaches:·         Lectures from teacher. Presentations will consists on PPT slides, some videos and discussion points.·         Lectures from guest lecturers-practitioners. At least two guest lecturers will pay a visit.·         Case discussions based on cases from within the textbook or from outside resources and exercises. Students will be asked to present their findings both as individuals and in groups.·         Class presentations of group project and “Teach Back” where students will have the opportunity to teach/study each other’s delivery of a case studyA big emphasize is put on students’ participation and good preparation.  
Language of instructionEnglish
Corporate Law ElectiveV-802-BULAECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of course6. Second cycle, advanced
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
The purpose of the course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of theories and concepts of Company law (50%), Competition law (20%), Stock market law (20%) and Debt collection procedure (10%).  Main legal principles, judgements and decisions of authorities and courts in the field are explored.  Special attention is given to various forms of legal documents that are used in business practice.
Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by students.
The student should:
- have gained a basic understanding of the general legal principles in the fields of company law, competition law, stock market law and debt collection procedure
The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks.
At the course´s completition, students will have an overview of legal practice in company law, competition law, stock market law and debt collection procedure, and a basic understanding of how to respond to situations and legal complications that can arise in business practice.

The ability to apply knowledge and skills. The student should:
- be able to apply his/her knowledge and skills within a chosen field of profession and/or in further studies. - students should be able to act independently and take reasoned decisions on the correct course of action.
Course assessment

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
Lectures on theory, explanation of approaches, techniques and responses to questions from students. The teaching methods rely on the students’ active participation and good preparation.
Language of instructionIcelandic
Tourism Marketing ElectiveV-840-TOMAECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content

There are basically two main perspectives within the Tourism Marketing field: the public side and the private side. The public side of Tourism Marketing covers the efforts done from the public institutions (usually National Tourism Organizations) to develop, brand, marketing and promote a country, a region or a city as a tourism destination. The private side of Tourism Marketing has to be with developing, branding, marketing and promoting the different businesses related to the tourism industry, like hotels, airlines, restaurants, parks, museums, etc.
The objective of the course is to introduce the central concepts of Tourism Marketing involved in defining and implementing a marketing strategy both from a public and a private side perspective.
In order to introduce the main concepts of public tourism marketing we will analyse the relevance of the tourism industry in the economy and also the positive effects of tourism for society in general. We will also elaborate on the way a place is developed as a tourism destination and the different marketing tools to be used in branding, marketing and promoting a place as a tourism destination with different examples and case discussions. Specifically we will explore and discuss the case of Iceland as a tourism destination.
The topic of private tourism marketing will be covered by defining the two main objectives of any tourism marketing campaign: customer attraction and customer retention. Customer attraction meaning developing marketing strategies to attract new customers to your tourism business (a hotel, a restaurant, an airline, etc). Customer retention meaning developing loyalty among the customers that you already have in your tourism business. Both customer attraction and customer retention will be covered by analysing cases, best practices and experiences of different hospitality and tourism leaders.
Another aspect that will be covered extensively in the course is digital marketing and the digital transformation that it is occurring today in the tourism industry.
Finally we will dedicate time to understand better the main trends that are happening now in the hospitality industry, specifically trends related to hotel management contracts and franchising.
In summary, different tourism marketing strategies would be discussed and compared including the implications for budget allocation and return on marketing investment. The final take away of the course will be doing a full marketing plan for a tourism business (a hotel) combining the two main challenges of any tourism business today: attract new customers and increase loyalty among the customers that we have.

Learning outcome - Objectives
Collection of facts, concepts, theories and techniques acquired by the degree holder. Knowledge can both be theoretical and applied. The student should be able to:• Describe the two main sides of tourism marketing, the public side and the private side.
• Describe and apply the concept of marketing strategy in the tourism field.
• Describe the marketing process and apply it to the tourism area.
• Describe the different elements of the markeitng mix in the context of the tourism industry.
• Describe and apply the changes digital marketing is bringing to the tourism industry.

The ability to apply knowledge to different tasks of the tourism marketing process. The student should be able to:• Critically asses the relevance of tourism marketing in different social and economic contexts.
• Identify the differences between tourism marketing and marketing in other areas or industries.
• Propose different digital marketing strategies in the tourism industry area.
• Construct a full marketing plan for a tourism business or institution, including digital marketing actions
Entail the ability to apply knowledge and skills to tourism marketing. The student should be able to:• Develop marketing strategies applicable to the tourism sector both in the private and public environments.
• Propose different marketing mix strategies in the tourism industry context.
• Present and defend his or her own solution to different tourism marketing cases.
• Work with a diverse team of people with different backgrounds and opinions.
Course assessment
• 20% Group Case Presentations: For every case to be discussed in this course students will work in groups to prepare the case solution and present it to the class. The evaluation of the case presentation will be based more on the content than on the aesthetics of the presentation.• 20% Individual Participation: Active participation during lectures, workshops and case discussion is expected from all the participants and will be evaluated based on the quality and on the quantity of the contributions.• 60% Final Individual Assignment:  The objective of the final individual assignment is to put in practice your learnings by analyzing a tourism marketing plan case about a destination or about a tourism business. The final case and its preparation questions would be handed to the students on the last session of the course and the students would have 1 week to submit their case analysis and solution.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
The course consists of:1. Lecture/discussion session that stress fundamental tourism marketing concepts and structure operational approaches for tourism marketing decision making and problem solving. The readings assigned to each session are recommended as background information to support the discussions.2. Unstructured problem solving sessions using cases where participants integrate the concepts and methods discussed to frame, analyse, and resolve representative tourism marketing problems.This twin stress on concepts as well as their application is designed to enable participants to not only understand the basic principles and tools of tourism marketing management, but also to gain experience in their actual use.Each case provides a detailed description of a marketing situation faced by a real marketing manager.  Participants should prepare each case with an action orientation – what would you do if you were the manager?  And, just as important, why would you do it?  Your participation in the case discussion should show the analysis you have used to come to your recommendation.
Language of instructionEnglish
Training and Development ElectiveV-840-TRDEECTS 3,75
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
No content found.
Learning outcome - Objectives
No objectives found.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish
Accounting for derivatives and other financial instruments ElectiveV-871-AFLEECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of course4. Second cycle, introductory
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleFour lectures pr. week
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
Í námskeiðinu verður gerð grein flokkun, mati og færslu fjáreigna og fjárskulda.  Einnig verður fjallað um sértæk mál svo afleiðusamninga um eigin hlutabréf, áhættuvarnarskil og upplýsingagjöf vegna fjármálagerninga
Learning outcome - Objectives
Að námskeiði loknu er stefnt að því að nemendur hafi: -Öðlast mikla og djúpa þekkingu á flokkun, færslu, mati og afskráningarreglum fjármálagerninga samkvæmt alþjóðlega reikningsskilastaðlinum IFRS 9.- Þekki mun á eigin fé og fjárskuldum (IAS 32) þegar kemur að flóknum gerningum svo sem afleiðum um eigin hlutabréf.-Hafi fengið góða innsýn í á hvern hátt afleiður eru notaðar í rekstri fyrirtækja, sérstaklega í áhættuvarnarskyni og þekki vel til áhættuvarnarreikningsskila og reglna þeim tengdum.- Þekki kröfur IAS 32 og IFRS 9 um upplýsingagjöf í ársreikningum félaga sem beita stöðlunum.- Þekki reglur um ákvörðun gangvirðis og stigveldisskiptingu gangvirðismat (IFRS 13).-Þekki reglur ársreikningalaga um fjármálagerninga og mun á þeim reglum og reglum alþjóðlegra reikningsskilastaðla.
-Geta beitt þekkingu á fjármálagerningum við flokkun, mat og færslu ólíkra tegunda slíkra gerninga.
- Bera kennsl á álitamál sem kunna að koma upp við flokkun og mat sem og við mat á afskráningu fjáreigna og fjárskulda. Í námskeiðinu verður gerð grein flokkun, mati og færslu fjáreigna og fjárskulda.  Einnig verður fjallað um sértæk mál svo afleiðusamninga um eigin hlutabréf, áhættuvarnarskil og upplýsingagjöf vegna fjármálagerninga
Course assessment
Skilaverkefni eru 4 talsins og eru öll hópverkefni.  Hvert þeirra vegur 10% og þau því samtals 40%. Mætingareinkunn vegur 5% en lokapróf 45%.

Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
Fyrirlestrar sem samanstanda af einkum af útskýringum og dæmum á reglum viðeigandi staðla (einkum IAS 32, IFRS 9, IFRS 7 og IFRS 13). Gert er ráð fyrir virkri þátttöku nemenda (m.a. með  mætingarskyldu) og gert ráð fyrir að nemendur undirbúi sig vel fyrir tíma.
Language of instructionIcelandic
MSc Thesis ElectiveV-888-THHLECTS 7,5
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseElective
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
No content found.
Learning outcome - Objectives
No objectives found.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish
Research Proposal CoreV-898-REPRECTS 0
Year1. year
SemesterSpring 2020
Level of courseN/A
Type of courseCore
PrerequisitesNo prerequisites.
ScheduleNo schedule found.
Lecturer
No lecturer found.
Content
No content found.
Learning outcome - Objectives
No objectives found.
Course assessment
No assessment found.
Reading material
No reading material found.
Teaching and learning activities
No activities found.
Language of instructionEnglish